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Projects

Tasmanian timber is utilised by leading architects, interior designers, furniture designer and makers, shop fitters, and building and construction firms. Explore this collection of projects for inspiration.
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Phat Fish – contemporary, timeless, quintessentially Tasmanian.

“Phat” is slang for cool. And in Hobart’s newest bar and seafood restaurant, Phat Fish, the owners have created a luxurious but inviting atmosphere that is just that - cool.
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From raw to refined: Pumphouse Point

Creating special places in spectacular landscapes is something Tasmanians have a knack for. And for visitors to the award-winning Pumphouse Point – a hotel like no other in the centre of one of the world’s most pristine natural environments – the experience is a truly remarkable one.
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House for Compassion: the Tasmanian Oak floor saving lives

It’s not often that a floor can make a claim to be saving lives. But the Tasmanian Oak floor, laid in a new-build charity home in Tasmania, is helping hundreds of families in third world countries.
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Forty thousand reasons to choose Tasmanian Oak

Anna Gowen, architect at TONIC Design, has designed the most opulent ceiling you could imagine for the ten-pin bowling alley at Crown Casino in Melbourne.
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Tasmanian Oak dowels deliver design flexibility and simplicity

The Noosa-based Australian furniture business began with their now-famous Babaneese stool, with Tasmanian Oak legs. Having now sold over 2000 stools, Green Cathedral co-founders and owners Sally and Tim Scarce have since become Tasmanian Oak devotees.
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Tasmanian Oak dowel: functional, decorative… art.

“This humble material is elevated to a higher level as it blurs the boundaries between the functional, the decorative and art,” says FMD Architects, Fiona Dunin of the Tasmanian Oak dowel in this incredible residential project. “The dowel establishes a consistent design approach through each space while varying its function in each instance.”
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Pizazz that’s Supernormal

Jason Stancombe, furniture designer and founder of Relm Furniture, was commissioned to design the dining furniture for Supernormal Natsu pop up restaurant, at the National Gallery of Victoria’s (NGV) garden restaurant. The restaurant was temporary, part of Natsu, a 10-day festival held in January 2018. The Supernormal pop-up site was designed by Peter King – Senior Exhibition Designer at the NGV.
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Our niche: to create projects that speak of this place

Architect Robert Morris-Nunn tries to use timber in every project. "The fact that it is a warm, living material means that people relate to it. If you think of Tasmania, it is the quality timbers that are here, and they should be used. It's a locally available resource. They're not used nearly enough, and they speak of this place like nothing else.
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Humanising Building: North Lakes Medical Centre, Brisbane

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Freycinet Lodge Coastal Pavilions: taking their cues from nature.

The new RACT Freycinet Lodge Coastal Pavilions offer an immersive accommodation experience within the coastal bush of the Freycinet National Park on Tasmania’s East Coast. Designed by Liminal Studio, and built by Cordwell Lane, the Waterfront Pavilions take their cues from nature.
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The sentinel on the edge of a cliff: Captain Kelly’s Cottage

Perched atop a very large cliff on a remote island sits the cottage of mercantile adventurer Captain Kelly, looking out to sea. Untouched since the early 1830's a Tasmanian architect has
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Salamanca Building: a contemporary workplace that reflects the strong identity of Tasmania

With a 5 Green Star rating, Tasmania's new Salamanca Building serves as a benchmark for green building while showcasing the natural beauty of Tasmanian timbers, and the talent of Tasmanian designer/makers.