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Projects

Tasmanian timber is utilised by leading architects, interior designers, furniture designer and makers, shop fitters, and building and construction firms. Explore this collection of projects for inspiration.
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Phat Fish – contemporary, timeless, quintessentially Tasmanian.

“Phat” is slang for cool. And in Hobart’s newest bar and seafood restaurant, Phat Fish, the owners have created a luxurious but inviting atmosphere that is just that - cool.
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From raw to refined: Pumphouse Point

Creating special places in spectacular landscapes is something Tasmanians have a knack for. And for visitors to the award-winning Pumphouse Point – a hotel like no other in the centre of one of the world’s most pristine natural environments – the experience is a truly remarkable one.
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House for Compassion: the Tasmanian Oak floor saving lives

It’s not often that a floor can make a claim to be saving lives. But the Tasmanian Oak floor, laid in a new-build charity home in Tasmania, is helping hundreds of families in third world countries.
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Forty thousand reasons to choose Tasmanian Oak

Anna Gowen, architect at TONIC Design, has designed the most opulent ceiling you could imagine for the ten-pin bowling alley at Crown Casino in Melbourne.
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Tasmanian Oak dowels deliver design flexibility and simplicity

The Noosa-based Australian furniture business began with their now-famous Babaneese stool, with Tasmanian Oak legs. Having now sold over 2000 stools, Green Cathedral co-founders and owners Sally and Tim Scarce have since become Tasmanian Oak devotees.
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Tasmanian Oak dowel: functional, decorative… art.

“This humble material is elevated to a higher level as it blurs the boundaries between the functional, the decorative and art,” says FMD Architects, Fiona Dunin of the Tasmanian Oak dowel in this incredible residential project. “The dowel establishes a consistent design approach through each space while varying its function in each instance.”
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Pizazz that’s Supernormal

Jason Stancombe, furniture designer and founder of Relm Furniture, was commissioned to design the dining furniture for Supernormal Natsu pop up restaurant, at the National Gallery of Victoria’s (NGV) garden restaurant. The restaurant was temporary, part of Natsu, a 10-day festival held in January 2018. The Supernormal pop-up site was designed by Peter King – Senior Exhibition Designer at the NGV.
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Our niche: to create projects that speak of this place

Architect Robert Morris-Nunn tries to use timber in every project. "The fact that it is a warm, living material means that people relate to it. If you think of Tasmania, it is the quality timbers that are here, and they should be used. It's a locally available resource. They're not used nearly enough, and they speak of this place like nothing else.
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Humanising Building: North Lakes Medical Centre, Brisbane

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Freycinet Lodge Coastal Pavilions: taking their cues from nature.

The new RACT Freycinet Lodge Coastal Pavilions offer an immersive accommodation experience within the coastal bush of the Freycinet National Park on Tasmania’s East Coast. Designed by Liminal Studio, and built by Cordwell Lane, the Waterfront Pavilions take their cues from nature.
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The sentinel on the edge of a cliff: Captain Kelly’s Cottage

Perched atop a very large cliff on a remote island sits the cottage of mercantile adventurer Captain Kelly, looking out to sea. Untouched since the early 1830's a Tasmanian architect has
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Salamanca Building: a contemporary workplace that reflects the strong identity of Tasmania

With a 5 Green Star rating, Tasmania's new Salamanca Building serves as a benchmark for green building while showcasing the natural beauty of Tasmanian timbers, and the talent of Tasmanian designer/makers.
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Hot soup, inviting design

To expand into a second location in Melbourne, owner of Laksa King Restaurant, Esmond Wong, sought out Urbourne Architecture and Crown Shopfitters to create a stylish and warm new interior. To achieve this inviting new look, Tasmanian timber dowels were used in a unique and stylish way throughout.
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RACT’s new vessel combines luxury and sustainability to offer an immersion into the wild

Tasmania’s wild west. The natural wonder and pristine beauty of this corner of the state has remained somewhat of a mystery to many due to its remote location. Wanting to reveal this UNESCO Wilderness World Heritage Area to more people while respecting the sanctity of this remote land, RACTs Gordon River Cruises has recently launched the maiden voyage of the ‘Spirit of the Wild’, the newest vessel in their fleet of public cruises. Paying homage to local designers, builders and artisans to create the crown jewel of their fleet, Tasmanian materials were also chosen where possible making Tasmanian Timber an obvious choice.
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Tinderbox’s private retreat AERIE gives visitors a true Tasmanian outlook with a global twist

Tucked away thirty minutes south of the bustling streets of Hobart sits the historic and scenic Tinderbox suburb. Perfectly situated atop a densely forested hill overlooking Bruny Island, Storm Bay, D’Entrecasteaux Channel and the Iron Pot Lighthouse at the mouth of the Derwent River, these advantageous views offered the perfect site for a military fort and training grounds during WWII. While some evidence of the area’s history can still be seen, the suburb now offers its residents a place of peace and solace, and for visitors of the private retreat AERIE, a chance to literally soak in the views from a Tasmanian Timber clad hot tub.
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The 19th Century Tasmanian Oak barn bought back to life by Whisky

Over 100 years ago a magnificent Tasmanian Oak barn was built on the Lawrenny Estate, a valuable swathe of land 80km north of Hobart. Thanks to a deep desire to drink superb whisky for the rest of his days, the current owner of the Estate embarked on a new venture – restoring his 100-year old, somewhat tottery, barn into Tasmania’s best whisky and gin distillery.
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A homecoming design: Franklin Square

Nestled within the heart of Hobart between the city and historic Sullivan’s Cove, sits one of Hobart’s classic parks, Franklin Square. A quiet refuge for office dwellers on their lunch breaks and a sanctuary for tourists and families alike, this iconic park has maintained its existence since the 1860’s and has just undergone an award-winning revamp featuring Tasmanian Celery Top Pine.
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Tasmanian Timber used to create refined comfort at MAP Architecture

As they say, first impressions are everything. And for one of Melbourne’s up and coming architecture firms, MAP Architecture, creating and designing a new office space that allowed clients to gain a sense of their thoughtful and refined architectural style was a must.