Hydrowood

Hydrowood is timber reclaimed from the depths of the Pieman River (hydro) Dam on Tasmania's West Coast.

Having laid dormant under water for more than 30 years, these forests, once lost, are now producing both Eucalyptus and sought after special species timbers from trees that were 200-1000 years old.

The sustainably salvaged specialty timbers include Huon Pine, Sassafras and Myrtle as well as Eucalyptus and Blackwood.

The timbers are ideal for use by furniture designers, woodworkers, as well as in high-end residential and commercial construction.

Location

70 Hampden Road Battery Point Tasmania Australia 7004

Phone: +613 6333 4024
Email: amorgan@sfmes.com.au
Website: http://hydrowood.com.au/

Projects

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A beacon of tranquility, Tasmanian Oak shines in the Lantern House by Timmins + Whyte

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Au naturale. Tasmanian Oak stuns in its organic form in these Melbourne homes

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Concrete and Blonde Bombshell- Tasmanian Oak helps transform this Sydney heritage home

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RACT’s new vessel combines luxury and sustainability to offer an immersion into the wild

Spirit of the Wild
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A homecoming design: Franklin Square

Franklin Square
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More Than a Little luxury

Hydrowood, Tasmanian Oak
Project Article

Custom for a cause

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Rustic but refined, Tasmanian Timber brings a bushy luxury to these Queensland homes

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Re-imagining Hobart City Hall with a floor fit for a Queen

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From bay views to beer taps, JAWS Architects uses Tasmanian Oak to tell a local story

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Phat Fish – contemporary, timeless, quintessentially Tasmanian.

Phat Fish
Project Article

Tasmanian Blackwood heats things up at London Restaurant, Mama Fuego

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Reclaimed Tasmanian Myrtle furniture by Simon Ancher transforms Freycinet Lodge

Freycinet Lodge
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Tasmanian Oak wins Australasian Floor of the Year

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Salamanca Building: a contemporary workplace that reflects the strong identity of Tasmania

Parliament House
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Pirie Street Extension by Preston Lane

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Tried, trusted and true, Tasmanian Oak is a natural fit for Hobart’s Studio ilk

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Tasmanian Oak? Andrew Simpson Architects say Y not

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Going green with stone and wood: Limestone House by John Wardle Architects

Project Article

Broached Goulder: an Australian furniture designer-maker’s multigenerational narrative

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Bona Vista by Studio Prineas