Tasmanian timber is utilised by leading architects, interior designers, furniture designer and makers, shop-fitters, and building and construction firms. Explore this collection of projects and articles for inspiration, or use the filters above to refine your search.

Proudly perched in West Launceston, Birdhouse Studios by Gillian van der Schans offers a glimpse of Tasmania’s high-end-but-humble design

Gillian van der Schans is a veteran to the Tasmanian design industry. Born and raised in Tasmania, van der Schans had a short stint in Sydney to complete her studies but returned back to her island state where she knew she wanted to establish her career in architecture. Lecturing undergraduate architecture students at The University of Tasmania for eight years, van der Schans then went on to establish her own practice that she has maintained for the last two decades. Having created dozens of mostly residential projects for clients around the state, van der Schans’ love for Tasmania’s rough and rugged landscape has kept her on her toes – and she wouldn’t have it any other way.

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A tub fit for a prince

Deep within Tasmania’s lush forests rests the prince of all Tasmanian timbers- Huon Pine. A conifer, Huon Pine is renowned for its exceptional durability, workability and beauty; the envy of Australia’s craftsmen and timber enthusiasts. In 2021, craftsman Emanuel ‘Manny’ Oppliger of Wood + Water, was commissioned to use this timber to make a custom piece in a private residence. While Huon Pine furniture has always been prized, Oppliger’s specialty lies elsewhere- in making custom handcrafted timber bathtubs.

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Maximum style, minimum waste

The word ‘liminal’ means at the threshold; exploring the potential of what can be. This word is also the name of Hobart-based LIMINAL Studio and it’s what drives their approach on every project. Constantly on the threshold of or relating to a sensory threshold; exploring the possibilities of what can be; discovery in transition…LIMINAL Studio is where transformation takes place. And from their long list of award-winning architectural projects, spaces and objects, it’s clear that this transdisciplinary studio is doing just that.

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Lands Building Office Redevelopment by Xsquared Architects

Xsquared Architects designed and documented a total refurbishment of the iconic Lands Building at 134 Macquarie Street in Hobart, Tasmania. This was a substantial project for the Department of Primary Industries Parks, Water and the Environment. All 11 floors of the office building were changed. Xsquared Architects created a standardised floor layout to provide each branch with the same level of amenity. This occurred by involving the different client groups in extensive consultation and dialogue.

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Tasmanian Oak transforms this 1800’s pub and bistro by Enth Degree Architects

Just on the outskirts of Melbourne sits Templestowe Hotel, lovingly known by locals as The Tempy. Originally established in 1868, the venue just received a sparkling renovation by Melbourne based architecture studio, Enth Degree Architects. Revamping the large venue and seamlessly combining the hotel’s different spaces to create a cohesive style throughout, Tasmanian Oak was used as the common thread to stitch the warm but modern design together throughout this welcoming community hub.

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Assessing Quality and Durability When Specifying Timber Flooring

Naturally warm and attractive, timber remains among the most popular choices for flooring. One of the world’s oldest building materials, timber’s physical properties and potential for sustainability are highly regarded. Combining premium aesthetics with durability, timber has been a reliable choice for interior applications for centuries. It is also eco-friendly, being less emissions-intensive and more sustainable over its lifecycle than other building materials like steel and concrete. However, when specifying timber for specific applications, the varying properties of different species must be taken into account.

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Showcased on a global stage, Tasmanian CLT proves it is the product of the future

Bringing innovation to the world, the Expo 2020 Dubai provides an opportunity to showcase ideas whilst connecting and collaborating with other nations across government, business, culture, research and education. Taking place from 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022, with 190 countries represented in a single location, Expo will generate ideas to address the needs of a fast-changing world and connect Australia to new global opportunities.

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Going green with stone and wood: Limestone House by John Wardle Architects

John Wardle Architects’ Limestone House is a home unlike any other in Australia. Staying within the confines of two environmental agendas, the Living Building Challenge and Passivhaus, the contemporary home is brimming with robust natural materials and designed to ensure the house will generate more energy than it will consume, making it one of the greenest houses in Australia. Specified for its beauty, locality and certification, Reclaimed Tasmanian Oak was used inside in beautiful contrast to the home’s namesake limestone material in this stunning Toorak home.

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Tasmanian Oak delivers the wow factor in fitzpatrick+partners new Sydney CBD office

Playing a role in the development of a city’s skyline is no easy task. But with decades of experience, knowledge and expertise, that’s just what the bustling office of Sydney based architecture firm Fitzpatrick + Partners have been doing. From high rise office buildings to ingenious health infrastructure to bespoke residential projects, Director James Fitzpatrick has played a crucial part in designing the look and feel of Australia’s biggest cities.

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The Tasmanian women making waves in the built environment: Kyra Wood, Postdoctoral fellow, University of Tasmania, Centre for Sustainable Architecture with Wood

Following the completion of her studies in Architecture at the University of Adelaide, Kyra Wood practiced architecture for several years, before continuing her education as a researcher looking at the cultural aspects of architecture and design in countries like Japan, South Korea and Vietnam. Fast forward to today, Kyra is a postdoctoral fellow studying timber as a building material at the University of Tasmania’s Centre for Sustainable Architecture with Wood. With a fascination for discovering how materials impact the built environment, Kyra says there’s no time like the present to learn new things. And so she does. Taking her fascination for timber to the National Institute for Forest Products Innovation, which is jointly funded by the Commonwealth and State governments and the timber industry, Kyra has been working to uncover how characteristics of Tasmania’s timber could be improved, helping to reduce waste and increase value by creating a highly durable and sustainable building material. Endlessly passionate about her work, Kyra hopes that her research not only sparks the interest of the architecture industry’s leaders but also can create lasting change.

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The Tasmanian women making waves in the built environment: Claire Ferri, Bury Kirkland Ferri

Hobart’s leading interior design studio Burk Kirkland Ferri, was established in 2017 after a partnership formed between Claire Ferri and the former Bury and Kirkland (est.2002) after having successfully consulted as an interior designer for the practice. The reigns now sit in Director and Principal Designer Claire Ferri’s lap after having taken sole ownership of the thriving studio in 2019. Claire has led charge on some of Hobart’s most iconic hospitality and residential interiors, including the award-winning Tailor Tasmania Pod house featured on Grand Designs Australia, Ettie’s, Fondru’s, The Whaler and most recently the Spring Bay Mill in Triabunna. Without prescribing to a specific design aesthetic, Claire’s designs are developed through exploring the inner workings of her client’s minds, often creating a masterpiece of work without the client having a clear awareness of, or words to express their personal tastes, but the result is precisely what they wanted – and more. Playing with textures, natural and local materials, Claire’s designs are intended to be deeply loved and made for longevity.

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The Tasmanian women making waves in the built environment: Laura McCusker

With over two decades of furniture making under her belt, Laura McCusker has called Tasmania home for the majority of her furniture making career. Having set up shop in an old apple packing shed just north of Hobart’s CBD, Laura has been on the receiving end of numerous awards, making custom pieces that have been celebrated in Australia and beyond. Drawing inspiration from unusual forms, Laura’s furniture is often made from the ordinary, then painstakingly reformed into a timeless piece of art, built to withstand the happenings of a lifetime and beyond. We caught up with Laura to uncover her favourite projects, her proudest achievements and how the voices of females in the furniture making industry can be elevated to give everyone a fair go.

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The Tasmanian women making waves in the built environment: Lucy Given, LUC Design

Tucked away inside one of Hobart’s oldest buildings on bustling Macquarie Street, sits award-winning home retailer, LUC Design. A Tasmanian institution amongst the design savvy, owner Lucy Given’s 30 years in the design industry has informed the deliberate curation of wares from around the globe that LUC Design has to offer. Having lived in cities across the world herself, Lucy’s style is vibrant and thoughtful, only hand selecting pieces for her store that will resonate with their potential owner. With an essentialist approach, Lucy’s ethos is to buy once and buy well, for one’s own wellbeing and that of the planet.

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The Tasmanian women making waves in the built environment: Kate Symons, Studio ilk

Working as an architect for 15 years, and in the profession for 18, Kate Symons’ focus has always been on one thing: the client. Customising and creating bespoke residential homes has been her specialty. After 5 years of co-directing architectural practice MGA.I, in the midst of 2020, Symons established her very own Hobart based practice, Studio ilk. With a client focused approach, Symons has also taken on projects beyond the family home working on commercial and public facing projects. After the establishment of her own practice, Symons shares how she’s found her sweet spot in the industry and why the future of Tasmania’s architecture industry looks bright.

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From bay views to beer taps, JAWS Architects uses Tasmanian Oak to tell a local story

With a commitment to design excellence, the team at Jaws Architects have taken on a diverse range of projects around Tasmania and beyond in their 90 plus years of existence. Now, the team of twelve including Director Scott Verdouw, are highly respected for their professionalism, creative innovation and exceptional design. Discussing two of their latest projects, the Rosny Hill House and Cascade Brewery, Scott Verdouw walks us through the brief and shares why the use of Tasmanian Oak in both projects was a natural choice.

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Rustic but refined, Tasmanian Timber brings a bushy luxury to these Queensland homes

Four years ago Architect Damian Goode founded his own firm, Hive Architecture, following a number of years at several well-known architecture firms in Brisbane. He now splits his time on projects between Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast. The sunny skies and laid-back attitude of Queensland’s coastline is a striking contrast from the wet and wild climate that favors the growth of some of Tasmania’s finest native timbers. Specified for use in several of Damian’s latest projects, Tasmanian timber added a touch rustic luxury to two Queensland homes.

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Au naturale. Tasmanian Oak stuns in its organic form in these Melbourne homes

Health. Balance. Harmony. Melbourne architect and interior designer, Melanie Beynon has grounded her practice in these principles, creating designs that bring a positive effect on her client’s health and wellbeing. Practicing as an interior designer in the UK and Melbourne for 20 years and as an architect for 10 years, Melanie Beynon’s designs encapsulate a holistic approach, fixing on the finest of details to support the physical, psychological and spiritual needs of a building’s inhabitants. To help bring these principles to life on her latest projects, Tasmanian Oak was specified for its natural tones, texture and beauty.

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From log to LOGR, new technology allows Tasmania’s harvested timber to be tracked in real-time

The evolution of forestry practices has greatly evolved over the last decade. From investing in research and technology to building sustainable communities, to harvesting reclaimed timber from the bottom of a remote lake, to studying the density of plantation grown timber for potential new uses, innovation has exploded across Tasmania’s forestry sector. The state’s forestry suppliers and companies are employing the most innovative systems and processes to ensure efficiency from tip to toe, all with the technology to prove it.

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A beacon of tranquility, Tasmanian Oak shines in the Lantern House by Timmins + Whyte

Setting up shop in the Melbourne suburb of Collingwood 13 years ago, architecture studio Timmins + Whyte have established themselves in the Melbourne architecture scene, creating contextual designs and bespoke buildings that solve problems for their clients. But Melbourne hasn’t always been home for half of the Timmins + Whyte duo. Having been born and raised in Tasmania and having studied architecture at the University of Tasmania, Sally Timmins says Tasmania will always be in her bones, and the use of its timbers will too.

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Concrete and Blonde Bombshell- Tasmanian Oak helps transform this Sydney heritage home

Originally built at the turn of the 20th century, a classic heritage home along the tree lined streets of Sydney’s inner west suburb of Annandale, has just undergone a major makeover by the team from Sydney based architecture studio, Carter Williamson. Brought to life to meet this century’s demands but highlighting some of the home’s original quirks and attributes, ‘Concrete Blonde’ offers an oasis for its occupants to come home to that is tactile, warm and playful.

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Tasmanian Oak? Andrew Simpson Architects say Y not

Having trained as an architect and interior designer with over 20 years of practice and a strong connection to academia, Andrew Simpson is the founding director at his own practice, Andrew Simpson Architects. Spending time studying, teaching and working in cities around the world, Andrew now calls Melbourne home but the learnings from his time abroad influence and inspire his projects today. Working on a range of projects including residential, university and healthcare, the studio’s latest project along the Great Ocean Road is what holiday home dreams are made of.

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Tasmanian Oak: Australia’s beloved material

Warm, dense and resilient, Tasmanian Oak is the preferred hardwood for a wide range of applications. It can be used in all forms of construction as scantlings, paneling and flooring, and can be glue-laminated to cover long spans. Veneers, plywood and engineered products are also available, as well as its use in furniture making. While each Tasmanian timber species brings forth different qualities and aesthetic attributes, the most abundant with the widest range of applications is Tasmanian Oak.

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Timber is a responsible choice

Consumers and professionals want to be assured that the timber products they specify or purchase are coming from responsibly and sustainably managed forests. But with multiple certification schemes available in Australia, it’s hard to know what the best environmental choice is. When selecting timber, first and foremost, consumers must select timber that hold sustainability certification. Forest certification shows that a timber product has come from a responsibly and sustainably managed forest. The two largest internationally recognised forest certification schemes are PEFC and FSC.

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Tasmanian Veneer – uniformity or inimitability? The Specifiers ‘lolly-shop’

Tasmanian veneers have long been sought after for a variety of applications with some stunning examples of the capability of the product in beautiful furniture and custom doors and cabinetry. Veneer has traditionally been revered for its uniformity. The matchless repetition created by thinly slicing timber from one larger piece was sought after for cabinetry and linings, particularly in large commercial fitouts.

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Tasmania’s Native Special Species Timber – available for specification

Tasmania, with its unique geography and environment, has some of the finest cool temperate native forests in the world and an expanding hardwood and softwood plantation estate. Using only the soil, sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide from the air, these forests produce a diverse and premium range of beautiful timbers in substantial quantities. Renowned for almost 200 years, each species has its own character and individual richness.

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Into the wild, Cumulus Studio reveals Poetic Vision at Cradle Mountain Visitor’s Centre

Almost two hours west of Launceston sits the state’s jewel and international tourist destination, Cradle Mountain. It’s lush and tranquil landscape is home to enchanted rainforests, rolling grassland and provides habitat to the state’s elusive Tasmanian Devil and other famous fauna. Cumulus Studio has just completed a revamped version of the Cradle Mountain Visitor’s Centre that mirrors the beauty of its natural surroundings, reflected through the choice of material.

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With a history steeped in quality, Astra Furniture is a proud manufacturer of 100% Australian made furniture

With 40 years in the furniture manufacturing business, there’s one thing owner and director of Astra Furniture Arki Tsorakidis won’t sacrifice, and that’s quality. Priding the decades old business in making exceptional furniture all manufactured within Australia, the family run business operates out of a 30,000 square foot factory using state of the art technology to ensure precision and the finest hardwoods they can get ahold of, including Tasmanian Oak and Blackwood. Using Tasmanian species to make their sturdy and lasting hardwood timber furniture, each piece is made to stand the test of time, making a true statement of sustainability.

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A tribute to Tasmania, Cumulus Studio’s Stillwater Seven honours history and place

With offices in Tasmania and interstate, Cumulus is an award-winning architecture studio and the brainchild behind some of Tasmania’s most iconic hospitality destinations including Pumphouse Point, Willie Smith’s and Devils Corner. With dozens of awards under their belts for these eye-catching projects that evoke an emotive response from their inhabitants and passersby, Cumulus studio continues to break the mold with their designs produced in a collaborative effort from their timber loving team.

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Questions on Tasmanian Timber? Ask an expert.

Tasmanian Timber has teamed up with the Centre for Sustainable Architecture with Wood (CSAW) at the University of Tasmania to deliver a free expert timber helpline service. The free-call service is available to anyone specifying timber and using Tasmanian timber, and provides support on choosing the right timber for the right application, obtaining quotes from suppliers, and troubleshooting problems throughout a project. Michael Lee, a timber industry technical pro, operates the helpline, supported by 20 PHD candidates from the School of Architecture who are at the cutting edge of timber research.

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Cloudy with a chance of impeccable design

Derived from the Latin word for ‘heap’ or ‘pile’ Cumulus Studio has embodied the origin of this word, weaving it into the lifestyle and culture of their practice. Believing that through working together, a critical mass of ideas can accumulate quickly- forming idea clouds which then can take on any size or form and be manipulated to suit conditions. Using this collaborative approach on all of their projects and utilizing the strengths across their three studios in Hobart, Launceston and Melbourne, Cumulus has been designing, creating and executing award winning architecture for almost a decade.

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Precise and predictable, Tasmanian Timber’s Quality Assurance Program delivers confidence

With every building job, each material specified is carefully considered to ensure that it matches the brief, is suitable for the application and fits within the allocated budget. But before the material reaches the project site, what type of checks are being done on the material to ensure it performs as predicted? These checks are especially important with timber products. Tasmanian Timber’s Quality Assurance Program is a rigorous auditing system that ensures that our product performs consistently – so that specifiers can too.

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How our homes make us feel has never been more important

Humans have an innate affinity with the natural world. Now that we are spending most of our time at home due to COVID-19, the environment that we surround ourselves with is more important than ever. In recent years research has shown that design features within the built environment that reconnect people with nature (Biophilic design) can have a positive effect on wellbeing. Biophilic design can reduce stress and improve your emotional state. The bottom line is that nature makes us feel good – and we can all use a little of that right now.

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The Lady in the White Ute talks Tasmanian Timber

Laura McCusker Furniture was established in 1996 under the flight path as she documents, in Sydney’s gritty, industrial inner-west. Since relocating to Hobart in 2003 she and Peter Howard have continued to make quality hand made, bespoke pieces tailored to their clients’ specific needs. Whether the brief be to craft an exquisite cheese trolley to delight and intrigue, or to create a timeless rocking chair from hand picked timbers, Laura can do it all.

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Grown in Tassie, crafted in Queensland: Meet Blackwood Collective

Just north of Brisbane’s CBD, sits Gareth Robertson’s workshop, Blackwood Collective. And it’s not just any workshop. Blackwood Collective specialises in high-end custom residential and commercial furniture, joinery and carpentry. Every piece coming out of the workshop expertly handcrafted with an acute sense of detail, made to perfectly fit the space it will call home. While Robertson is a fan of all Tasmanian timber species, as the name of his business suggests, Tasmanian Blackwood is Robertson’s material of choice, time and time again.

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A new generation of innovative timber products with sustainability at their core

The balance between conservation of our wild natural places and producing enough beautiful wood products to meet society’s demands, is not an easy task. But it’s vital that we get it right. Because as The Ultimate Renewable resource, trees are part of the solution to the greatest challenge of our time – climate change. Enthusiasts of using timber across their range of large-scale projects, Sydney architecture firm Fitzpatrick + Partners were invited to take part in the Visiting Architects Program, an experience designed to showcase Tasmania’s forest management practices and forest products. The firm got an up-close glimpse of the innovative forest products that are leading the nation’s forestry sector and how Tasmania’s processors are committed to getting the most out of every log.

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Tasmania’s managed forests make a strong case for world class sustainability

Tasmanian timber is sourced from forests that are sustainably managed, independently audited and certified to an internationally acclaimed standard. The end product is revered by designer makers, architects, interior designers and furniture makers. Playing a significant role in the global fight against climate change, timber is The Ultimate Renewable resource. On the back of the Visiting Architects Program, Rod Pindar, partner at renowned architecture firm, Fitzpatrick + Partners and Anne Schutter, Manager of the Biodiversity Program at the Forest Practices Authority (FPA), discuss Tasmania’s world class forest management system and how its sustainable management is ensuring Tasmania’s forests and forest species flourish for eternity.

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An eye-opening experience for Fitzpatrick+Partners

Timber is the material of choice for Sydney-based architects Fitzpatrick+Partners. Considered an authority in timber construction on large scale projects, offering expertise on some of the world’s greatest buildings, founding Principal, James Fitzpatrick is turning heads in the design world. Fitzpatrick+Partners were invited to take part in the Tasmanian Visiting Architects Program, an experience designed to showcase Tasmania’s forests and forest management practices. The Partners gained a new found knowledge around Tasmania’s regrowth forests.

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Tasmanian Visiting Architects Program highlights sustainability, innovation and collaboration

Fitzpatrick + Partners, one of Australia’s leading architectural firms, travelled to Tasmania recently to experience firsthand Tasmania’s forest management practices and timber industry. The firm’s four Partners spent three days exploring Tasmania’s beautiful forests, learning about how they are managed, the Forest Practices System and sustainability certification. They also learned about Tasmanian timber processing and products, and the applications for those products in both residential and commercial settings.

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Macquarie House Innovation Hub set to inspire with Tasmanian timbers throughout

The year is 1830 in the infant city of Launceston. A three-story Bond Store is built from stone, using timber sawn from nearby to construct the interior. Set in the center of this buzzing new town, the Bond Store is set up to service the city’s eclectic and growing population, with many eager to have a fresh start from a grim past. Serving its purpose to help establish The City of Launceston, the Bond Store was in use for years until its necessity fizzled. The old Bond Store has sat empty and idol for decades, until now.

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A tent pitched on Bruny Island

With the only plans in the brief being to take advantage of the mountain and the pristine water views of Tasmania’s Bruny Island, Dock4 Architects decided to pitch a tent. And not just any tent. A tent of architectural perfection. Modest in size but filled with geometric angles, character and modern charm, the award-winning Apollo Bay House blurs the lines between indoor and outdoor living. Creating an oasis for its Melbourne hailing residents, Dock4 brought the outdoors in with the use of Tasmanian Oak throughout the home and the clever use of translucent triple-polycarbonate to act as a ‘tent skin’ allowing the ample light to filter throughout the home.

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Tasmanian Timber Structure ‘In Absence’ Launches at the National Gallery of Victoria

The annual architecture commission at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) is unique in Australia and highly prestigious. It is a blind competition with an open brief, providing freedom to architects and architecture students from across Australia to test their submissions on merit alone – letting their ideas and creativity with materials and design compete on a level playing field. The resulting structure is on exhibit for six months. In Absence, the 2019 installation, supported by Tasmanian Timber, officially launches tonight.

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Broached Goulder: an Australian furniture designer-maker’s multigenerational narrative

Fourth generation Australian furniture designer-maker and Tasmanian Timber ambassador Jon Goulder, is celebrated for his fine craftsmanship, attention to detail and award-winning designs. His works have made their way around the world, having made custom pieces for private clients, one-off installation designs with some pieces becoming permanent fixtures in State and National museums across Australia. Commissioned by design trailblazers Broached Commissions, Goulder has just completed Broached Goulder, a collection of pieces that meld the complex intricacies of generations of furniture making- all made with Tasmanian timber species.

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A Rustic Jewel on the Banks of the Tamar

Set alongside Tasmania’s Tamar river in a lush valley known for its ample wineries, rests My Build’s latest completed design-build project, The Boathouse. While wine production may contribute to the area’s current economy, it hasn’t always been vines and corks. With its convenient location at the top end of the state, close to the Bass Straight, the area was formerly used for boat building. Now, The Boathouse sits atop an old boat yard used in the late 1800’s, with remnants of the lands former use still apparent when the tide is low. Used now as an escape from the city, this Tasmanian timber clad shack combines the best of both worlds, where old meets new in a quiet corner of Northern Tasmania

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Decreasing waste, increasing value and design opportunities: Porta aims to get the most out of every log

Australian timber manufacturer Porta has been in the timber industry for over 70 years. Porta prides themselves on being one of Australia’s leading suppliers of timber products, mouldings and custom moulding services to the building, trade, commercial and home improvement sectors. Leveraging their expertise in sustainable timber to source and provide aesthetically beautiful products for specifiers around Australia, they’re also upping their sustainability game to ensure every log processed through their Tasmanian mill is utilised to its fullest capacity. As part of this process, their Bridgewater mill in Tasmania’s south is currently undergoing a significant upgrade.

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The team behind IN-TERIA celebrate refined simplicity through their thoughtful and sustainable designs

IN-TERIA Design and Architecture partners Karryn Dargie and Dean Baird are proud Tasmanian’s, and they’re making waves on the Tasmanian design front. Championing the work of carefully selected Tassie craftsman, this Hobart-based practice has created a timber centric hardware collection through the art of wood turning. The materials chosen for each piece are thoughtfully selected with sustainability at the forefront of the criteria. With each architectural project, IN-TERIA inject their love of timber when possible to create an end result that’s simple, refined and will last a lifetime and beyond, encapsulating the art of truly superior design.

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Integrating nature and design, Archiblox brings the outdoors in with Tasmanian Oak floors

Imagine waking up every morning surrounded by a scene of minimal, natural serenity. As you blink open your eyes taking in the first glimpses of the day, you’re enveloped by a subtle glow as the rising sun reflects on the warm Tasmanian Oak timber floors throughout the space. Looking around the intentionally minimal but thoughtfully designed bedroom, touches of natural materials are everywhere, from the inviting leather armchair in the corner to the cool grey stone peeking out from the bathroom- all touches that you’ve helped handpick from a sustainable source. The inherent purity of your home’s surroundings creates a sense of peace and calm as you ease into your day. While this may sound like a distant dream for many future homeowners, there’s one design firm that is bringing this sustainable and beautiful architectural dream into reality for Australian’s, one prefabricated modular home at a time.

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The Seed House: Fitzpatrick’s timber monument

James Fitzpatrick has been designing buildings across Australia and Southeast Asia for the past 30 years. As the founding partner of Fitzpatrick+Partners, one of Australia’s leading architectural design studios, the firm has come to be known for pushing the boundaries on technology and building systems with every new build. When it came time to design his own family home on Sydney’s lower North Shore, Fitzpatrick curated the ultimate mix of materials. The design includes his signature combination of geometry, an engagement with the surrounding environment, and a dedication to sustainable and natural materials. The result is the staggeringly impressive Seed House.

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Tinderbox’s private retreat AERIE gives visitors a true Tasmanian outlook with a global twist

Tucked away thirty minutes south of the bustling streets of Hobart sits the historic and scenic Tinderbox suburb. Perfectly situated atop a densely forested hill overlooking Bruny Island, Storm Bay, D’Entrecasteaux Channel and the Iron Pot Lighthouse at the mouth of the Derwent River, these advantageous views offered the perfect site for a military fort and training grounds during WWII. While some evidence of the area’s history can still be seen, the suburb now offers its residents a place of peace and solace, and for visitors of the private retreat AERIE, a chance to literally soak in the views from a Tasmanian Timber clad hot tub.

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Hella Good Design

For more than forty years Melbourne diners have been flocking to ‘Stalactites’ to get their traditional Greek cuisine fix. Serving its patron’s mouth-watering traditional dishes based on what would be found on dinner tables across the Peloponnese region of Greece, the restaurant and Konstandakopoulos family have been on the receiving end of dozens of awards and media attention. While they continue to serve up traditional Greek dishes they have now created a low key and hip spin-off to the Melbourne restaurant scene, having opened the doors to Hella Good in 2018. While the food produced by the Konstandakopoulos family is usually in the spotlight, this time the focus lies on their newest establishment’s design featuring Tasmanian Oak.

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Where aesthetics and sustainability collide: The Surrey House renovation

On the fringe of Hobart’s CBD, clad in brown brick and cement slabs stands Surrey House. Built in 1978 the exterior is still reminiscent of the time and style in which it was built. But forty years after its doors opened, hidden behind this boxy and retro façade, is the new Surrey House featuring three new state of the art office fit-outs for Pitt & Sherry, Aldanmark and Ray White, where aesthetics and sustainability collide. Unknowingly paying tribute to the building’s beginnings, Tasmanian hardwoods are featured beautifully throughout.

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RACT’s new vessel combines luxury and sustainability to offer an immersion into the wild

Tasmania’s wild west. The natural wonder and pristine beauty of this corner of the state has remained somewhat of a mystery to many due to its remote location. Wanting to reveal this UNESCO Wilderness World Heritage Area to more people while respecting the sanctity of this remote land, RACTs Gordon River Cruises has recently launched the maiden voyage of the ‘Spirit of the Wild’, the newest vessel in their fleet of public cruises. Paying homage to local designers, builders and artisans to create the crown jewel of their fleet, Tasmanian materials were also chosen where possible making Tasmanian Timber an obvious choice.

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Jon Goulder breaks the mould with his all Australian Innate Collection for Spence & Lyda

Fourth-generation Australian furniture designer-maker Jon Goulder has pushed the envelope with materials and methods, creating the bespoke ‘Innate’ collection in collaboration with renowned Sydney design retailer, Fiona Lyda of Spence & Lyda. The first iteration of the Innate collection features moody dark tones and celebrates the use of Australian materials including the use of Tasmanian Oak and Blackwood.

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Redefining Outside In: The Valley House in Tasmania

Resting high on a hillside on Launceston’s rural fringe at St Leonard’s, Valley House is far from a stereotypical Australian bush dwelling. Its mix of cement sheet, steel cladding and local timbers immediately signals a fresh point of view that is a true celebration of place. Tasmanian architect Philip M Dingemanse redefines the clichéd notion of “outside-in” through his clever design and respect for the natural surrounds. Inspired by the landscape, the award-winning house is bent around the contour of a valley as if to welcome it in. The use of locally sourced Tasmanian timber throughout the home conveys a tactile and natural warmth, where visitors seamlessly transition from inside to outside.

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